Category Archives: Business of Sports

NFL Settles Concussion Lawsuit.

Today, August 29, 2013, the NFL reached a settlement with all 4,500 litigants in a lawsuit claiming that the NFL had hidden some of the risks of concussions. The settlement has a total value of $765 million to distributed, in large part, to the former players and their families. The remaining money will be used for baseline medical exams and to conduct research on concussions, particularly the impact on youth sports. The terms of the agreement state there is no admission of liability or guilt by the NFL or admissions of weakness of claims by plaintiffs. The payments will be distributed over the next 17 years, but half of the payment will be distributed over the next 3 years.

The judicial order can be found at the following link: http://www.scribd.com/doc/164000823/NFL-Concussion-Litigation-Settlement.  A more detailed list of the principal terms can be found here: http://nflconcussionlitigation.com/?p=1506

By CURB contributor Joshua Blessing, Florida Coastal JD Candidate 2014, BS Business Administration, Concord University, former Director of Golf, 2003 to 2011, Wolf Creek Golf Colf Club.

Little Known Federal Court Ruling Hints At NCAA Showdown With Current Student Athletes

It’s one thing to have a federal lawsuit by former so-called student athletes against the NCAA. It’s quite another to have current players suing the premier college sports regulator.  And it is even more cataclysmic if the case is certified as a class action allowing innumerable student athletes to share the consequences. That is the revolution that some have advocated for decades. Yet an unceremonious court ruling days ago lighting a match to this war has been little more than a back page blurb or a verbal footnote in talk radio and sportscasts.

The discreet little ruling last week was from federal judge Claudia Wilken in a case where the lead plaintiff is former UCLA star basketball player Ed O’Bannon. He and several other former players claim the NCAA has been fixing the price of an athlete’s image and likeness in a way that virtually eliminates a player from sharing in the value they created. The suit alleges the NCAA colludes with its member schools, TV networks and videogame manufacturers in violation of anticompetitive provisions of federal antitrust law. The claimed relief includes a share of the billions in revenue generated from the current system.\

Continue the story at www.forbes.com/sites/rogergroves/2013/07/10little-known-federal-court-ruling-hints-at-ncaa-showdown-with-current-student-athletes