Tag Archives: IRS

Court Rejects IRS Attempts to Regulate Tax-Return Preparers

Although the court concluded in Loving, et al. v. IRS, et al. that it may be wise as a policy matter to allow the IRS to regulate tax-return preparers more stringently, the court held firm to its traditional tools of statutory interpretation and ruled that Section 330 did not allow for such regulation.  Section 330 authorizes the IRS to “regulate the practice of representatives of persons before the Department of the Treasury.”  The IRS interpreted the statute to mean that it authorized the regulation of tax-return preparers.  However, three independent tax-return preparers argued that the interpretation of the IRS exceeded the agency’s authority under the statute.  The court decided to handle the issue of whether Section 330 gives the IRS authority to regulate tax-return preparers by employing all of the tools of statutory interpretation.  These tools include text, structure, purpose, and legislative history.

First, the court found that the term “representatives” in the statute should not include tax-return preparers because a representative is traditionally someone who has the authority to bind others.  Tax-return preparers cannot legally bind the taxpayer by acting on the taxpayer’s behalf.  Second, the phrase “practice…before the Department of the Treasury” ordinarily refers to practice during an investigation, adversarial hearing, or other adjudicative proceeding, which is different from the process of filing a tax return.  Next, the court considers the history of the statute.  The original language of the statute enacted in 1884 would not encompass tax-return preparers.  The statute specified the agency’s regulation of “agents, attorneys, or other persons representing claimants before his Department…otherwise competent to advise and assist such claimants in the presentation of their cases.”  Furthermore, when Congress re-codified the statute, it made it clear that there was no substantive change.  Therefore, the court held that the traditional tools of statutory interpretation rendered the IRS’s interpretation of Section 330 unreasonable and thus affirmed the judgment of the District Court.

By Ashley Ellerbe, JD,cum laude, from Florida Coastal School of Law, May 2013, , Practicing in Atlanta GA.

Top 12 Tax Scams of 2013

Contributor: Brittney Trigg, Florida Coastal School of Law JD and business law certificate candidate 2014, law clerk for Law Offices of Xavier Saunders, P.A.

Every year the IRS (Internal Revenue Service) issues a list of tax scams called the “Dirty Dozen” to remind taxpayers to protect themselves against a wide range of schemes during tax season. This year the IRS has just listed the following “Dirty Dozen” tax scams: Continue reading