In the Library this Week (March 25th – 31st):

- Low Cost Legal Research Workshops;
- Make-up (Statutes, Shepards, Cases & Secondary Sources) Workshops;
- Navigating Lexis & Secondary Sources Training;
- Cases & Statutes in Lexis Training;
- Navigating Westlaw & Secondary Sources Training;
- Cases & Statutes in Westlaw Training;
- Hot Dog Wednesday hosted by the Library & IT;
- Pick up your new Coastal ID in the Atrium on Monday & Tuesday from 10am-2pm;
- Possible noise from the Atrium on Tuesday & Thursday at noon.

Are you looking for a topic to write a paper about, or are you just interested in legal issues that courts disagree over?

It may be a little too late in the semester to start working on your legal research paper this semester, but maybe you could get an early start for next semester. Maybe you are interested in writing a paper for publication. Bloomberg BNA’s United States Law Week is a great resource for getting ideas for scholarly legal writing. The United States Law Week has a Key Features section that lists the current United States Circuit Court splits. Circuit Court splits provide great opportunities to write about unsettled legal issues. Bloomberg BNA United States Law Week is available on the library’s website on the Subscription Databases webpage, and access is available to faculty and students. Here are a couple more websites that also contain information on circuit splits Circuit Splits: A blog about cases ripe for review and Split Circuits: A blog dedicated to tracking developments concerning splits among the federal circuit courts.

In the Library this Week (March 18th-24th)

- Bluebooking for Your ALWR Workshops;
- Researching Administrative Law Workshops;
- Researching Legislative Histories Workshops;
- There may be noise from the atruim on Thursday, 11:30am-1:30pm;
- There may be noise in the Library (2nd and 3rd floors) on Friday, 1:30pm-2:30pm.

What do you like about Lexis Advance?

As a Librarian, I try to keep up with new research tools.  It has been hard before to see how cases are treated across jurisdictions, which can often be very helpful if arguing for a change in law.  But not anymore! Lexis Advance has a great feature that lets you see how cases have been treated by other courts across jurisdictions and across years.  Once you log into Lexis Advance (if you are having trouble with that, please contact any of the Librarians) just Shepardize a case.  Go to Citing Decisions and choose Grid.  Especially if you like to visualize what has happened to a case, this is a perfect resource.

Lexis has a great explanation of this feature, and other features of their Shepard’s service, in their information.

Are YOU Ready to Celebrate Sunshine Week?

If your response is, “What is sunshine week?” you are probably not alone.  Sunshine Week is a national initiative to promote a dialogue about the importance of open government and freedom of information. Participants include news media, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and others interested in the public’s right to know.  This is an important topic because access to the law is really important to lawyers, law students, and law librarians.  Check out all the great FREE legal information available on FDSys.  The Library of Congress makes finding legislative and congressional information a breeze with ThomasHere is an example of how an open government can force a public figure to answer for their use of public funds.  The list of reasons supporting open government and freedom of information is huge.  What reasons can you think of?

In the Library this Week (March 4th – 10th)

- ALWR Research Workshops;
- Researching Statutes Workshops;
- Advanced Bluebooking for Memos Workshops;
- Earplugs by request during midterms, ask at the Circulation Desk.

Library Spring Break Hours (March 8th -17th)
Friday (8th)               7:30am – 6:00pm
Saturday (9th)         10:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday (10th)         10:00am – 6:00pm
Monday (11th)        10:00am – 6:00pm
Tuesday (12th)       10:00am – 6:00pm
Wednesday (13th)  10:00am – 6:00pm
Thursday (14th)      10:00am – 6:00pm
Friday (15th)           10:00am – 6:00pm
Saturday (16th)       10:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday (17th)          Regular Hours

The oldest law library in the United States is a great resource for small firms and solo-practitioners!

The Jenkins Law Library located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is over 200 years old, but don’t let its age cause you to think that it is just a relic of the past. The Jenkins Law Library is still going strong and makes available a wealth of legal research tools and resources. Students, solo-practitioners, and law firms can become members of the law library and take advantage of the many databases and resources available. Even if you are not a member of the Jenkins Law Library, the law library offers services that may be useful to attorneys, such as legal research, copying, Shepardizing or Keyciting cases, and document delivery. The Jenkins Law Library is a great low cost alternative to other well-known legal information providers.

In the Library this Week (February 25th – March 3rd)

- How to Shepardize (citators) Workshops;
- Basic Bluebooking (Memo Style) Workshops;
- Navigating and Secondary Sources in Westlaw Training;
- Cases and Statutes in Westlaw Training;
- Cost Effective Research in WestlawTraining;
- Lexis ALWR Help;
- Possible noise from the atrium on Thursday, 7pm-9pm.

The CRAP test.

I like to follow blogs about libraries and research. One of my favorites is Lisa Gold: Research Maven. Lisa is a professional researcher, who explains research concepts well. Check out her colorful post, “The CRAP test for evaluating sources,” for a good explanation of how to decide if a source you have found can be relied upon. If you click the “Highlights” link at the top of her page, you can see a list of her most notable posts. My favorites are, “Spell-check is evil, but funny: The Cupertino Effect,” “Let’s talk about search,” and “In praise of browsing.”