Other law libraries

We at the Florida Coastal Library really, really like you all.  We are here to help and answer your questions.  But you may not be close by, you may need a print resource.  If you can’t come to us, then definitely go to another library!  They are (almost) as nice and helpful as we are.

Where can you go?  Well, that depends.  Most states have some kind of public law library system – you can look at some lists of those libraries, both national and regional.  You can also do a search in Google (or your favorite search engine) for something like county law library list (if you have an area, like Florida or California or Duval County, to add to the search that’s even better!).

You can also use public law school libraries for free in most cases.  And even private law schools will often let you in (sometimes for a small fee, but often at least a couple times for free).  There are also some lists of the law school libraries (this one goes directly to their catalogs, but you can then find the name of the law school near you).  Or you can look at the law schools and find their library page.

Once you find a library – do not be shy to talk to the librarians, they want to help you (just be sure to use your best library voice…).

Library Hours this Summer

New summer Library hours begin tomorrow (Thursday, 30th).

The Library will be open until 8pm every night.  The 1st floor of the Library will be open from 8pm-11pm after the rest of the Library closes each day. Library policies are still in effect during these hours.

The Reference Desk hours will be from noon-6pm on Monday-Thursday, and noon-4pm on Fridays.

 

In the Library this Week (May 17th – 19th)

Winners of the Rename the CYBERSCRIPT Contest
The winners of the Rename the CYBERSCRIPT Contest are Priscilla Justiniano and Katherine (Katy) Donaldson with the suggestion of the “Library’s Latest.”  The new name will start with volume 12 in August.

Katherine (Katy) DonaldsonPriscilla Justiniano  Here are our winners with their prizes.

 

 

 

 

Runners up with other great suggestions were Andrew Ricker, Hunter Whaley, Shakuwra Shaw, Stefano Portigliatti, Megan Becker, and Kimberly Morant. Thank you to everyone who submitted suggestions!!

Library  Hours
The Library Hours are kept up to date each day on the Library Homepage. The Reference Desk hours and the future hours of the Library including intersession and Memorial Day weekend are posted at http://www.fcsl.edu/ltc/ltc-hours.

How Do I Start My Research?

As summer jobs and internships start, one of the questions we get at the Library is “how do I start my research?”  The good news is, there are lots of resources on how to do that!

Some of the best resources are Libguides on legal research.  Libguides are created by librarians, and there are lots of law librarians helping you out!  Florida Coastal has a great one for low cost legal research

If you want more, run a search in Google for libguide starting legal research: .edu (that : .edu restricts the search to only school websites).  Or change up the language and run  starting legal research libguide: .edu (it will give you slightly different results).  Switch up the words for more results libguide beginning legal research: .edu for example.

Or, call a Librarian!  We are here all summer for you, whether it is for class, an externship or work!  You can call and leave a message, we will call you back – (904) 680-7612.  Or you can email us your question refdesk@fcsl.edu or use the Ask A Librarian page.

Good Summer Reads!

Are you looking for some light summer reading? Nothing is better at the beach than a law book! Why read the latest trashy novel or hot biography when Android apps in one hour for lawyers  or Finding your voice in law school: mastering classroom cold calls, job interviews, and other verbal challenges is available? You can find all your summer reading needs through the Coastal catalog including  these new acquisitions. Please shake the sand out before returning them.

Continue reading

Exam Day Jitters

What is the best way to deal with exam jitters?

Google, Bing, Duck Duck Go, Ask.com, and other sources will give you common wisdom and anecdotes about various techniques that have worked for other test takers. These may work for you.

But what if you want some no-nonsense, scientifically reliable, double-blind-tested techniques? If so, the best way to find them is to start by carefully selecting a source that contains that kind of material. You may have to try several sources until you find a good one.

I knew I wanted to find an article that contained carefully researched methods of dealing with test-day jitters. I was not interested in studies that simply measured anxiety levels. I wanted articles that would give me reliable advice. I settled on ProQuest eLibrary. I knew this source contained a range of newspapers and magazines that could have articles describing how to deal with exam jitters that would be properly sourced. I found the following tips from Sue Shellenbarger, Toughest Exam Question: What is the Best Way to Study?, WALL ST. J. ONLINE, Oct. 26, 2011.

  • If you are taking the exam in an unfamiliar place, visit the room in advance.
  • Set aside 10 minutes beforehand to write down your worries. Expressing yourself in writing will unburden you.
  • Envision yourself in a situation you find challenging and invigorating. Then switch your mental image to the testing room and imagine yourself feeling the same way. With practice, you’ll be able to summon up more confidence on test day.

Climate Change Findings and Figures

No matter where you fall on the hot-button topic of climate change there is no denying it’s an important issue.  The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) released a summary of its most recent set of findings and figures in March.  The WMO is a specialized agency of the United Nations with a membership of 191 Member States and Territories (as of January 1, 2013). It originated from the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), which was founded in 1873. Established in 1950, WMO became the specialized agency of the United Nations in 1951 for meteorology (weather and climate), operational hydrology and related geophysical sciences.

As weather, climate and the water cycles know no national boundaries, international cooperation at a global scale is essential for the development of meteorology and operational hydrology as well as to reap the benefits from their application. WMO provides the framework for such international cooperation.

This summary and website can lead you to a ton of other international sources on climate and environmental law.  Use the list of topics at the top of WMO’s home page or the facets on the left to find relevant information that may be more difficult to get to simply by using the web site search box.  Evaluating and making use of all access points (also known as finding aids) are important research processes.

Finishing Up a Paper?

It is that time of year again; when a law students’ thoughts turn to finals and papers. Are you one of the many students who are putting the finishes touches on a paper and need some Florida statistics? Take a look at this website that gives stats on all sorts of Florida goodness!

This site will give statistics on Crime, Budgets, Education, Voting and much, much more!