Tag Archives: Criminal Law

Curl up with a new book during Snowmageddon

When your friends in colder climes tell you how they are digging themselves out of a winter wonderland, tell them you too are staying indoors during this cold spell-with a new book from the Coastal Library! Here are the latest acquisitions after the jump for you to check out.

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Good Summer Reads!

Are you looking for some light summer reading? Nothing is better at the beach than a law book! Why read the latest trashy novel or hot biography when Android apps in one hour for lawyers  or Finding your voice in law school: mastering classroom cold calls, job interviews, and other verbal challenges is available? You can find all your summer reading needs through the Coastal catalog including  these new acquisitions. Please shake the sand out before returning them.

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Holiday Gifts Worth Celebrating!

The holiday season is always full of gifts!

Some people may spend the Holiday in Handcuffs (I haven’t seen that movie, but just the idea of Clarissa/Sabrina and A.C. Slater together makes me miss the 1990s), but we had a better holiday, adding some excellent resources to the Library & Technology Center collection this past month.

Given finals and the short December month at Coastal, there are fewer additions than normal, but we’ve nevertheless got some excellent ones worth highlighting.

1) Typography for Lawyers: Essential Tools for Polished & Persuasive Documents.
For some of us, the title is enough to sell this one. For most of you, it is more likely to cause your eyes to glaze over. Trust me when I say this one is worth a look. A slim softcover volume of only 170 pages (plus sample documents and an appendix), Typography for Lawyers addresses some of the most common issues faced by those attempting to craft great legal documents. All sorts of questions on formatting and usage are discussed and simple, straight-forward answers are provided whenever possible. Although it was originally tabbed to be sent into the General Collection, after review by library staff and students, it has been deemed of sufficient importance to be moved into the Reference Collection so it will always be on hand.

If all that wasn’t enough to convince you it is worth a look, take note of the fact that Bryan Garner has lent his name to the effort and written the foreword. You may know that name, but if not try typing it into our library catalog. You may recognize some of the results, like Garner’s Dictionary of Legal UsageReading Law: the Interpretation of Legal Texts (with Scalia), Classic Essays on Legal Advocacy, and a little book called Black’s Law Dictionary.

2) Phake: the Deadly World of Falsified and Substandard Medicines
The library’s own Jamie Marie Keller has actually read this book already, and was kind enough to provide us with this review:
Phake by Roger Bate (Economist with the American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research) discusses the dangers of unregulated consumer medical drug markets. The book includes empirical studies of the safety of drug quality in Africa, India, China, and the Middle East. While the book focuses on counterfeit drugs and substandard laboratories, it does not differentiate between drugs that are counterfeit simply because they are not created by the corporation that holds the patent on the medication and other counterfeit medicines. Bate praises the efforts of the FDA to regulate the drug market in the United States and encourages other countries to develop similar agencies.

3) Covenants Not to Compete: a State-by-State Survey
Current through the end of 2011, this state-by-state survey includes everything from Abandonment of Customers to Writing Requirement. The first volume of this three-volume set lists the most common questions and on which pages the answer for each state can be found. Each state section provides ample citations to primary sources as well as a cumulative history on each portion.

4) All the Missing Souls: a Personal History of the War Crimes Tribunals
For this review, we turn to Martin Wenick of American Diplomacy (via Amazon.com):
All the Missing Souls clearly fills a gap in literature on the administration of international justice, and it is must reading for those interested in emerging themselves profoundly in this field. His direct personal involvement in working to create international tribunals to bring to justice individuals responsible for the worst of the ‘atrocity crimes’ of recent decades demonstrates that perseverance and tenacity can make a difference on the international scene.

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Trick or Treat or Where is Your Permit?

Are you planning to wear a mask with your Halloween costume?  Be sure you don’t need a permit!  At the Stupid Laws & Dumb Laws blog they have a list of Halloween specific laws that might affect you depending on where you plan to celebrate.  Click the link and see if they found a law that might affect you.

Note the disclaimer at the bottom of their page.  “The laws listed here are for entertainment purposes only. We have tried to cite specific references when available but, we make no guarantees on the validity of these laws and as such: the laws and regulations including the interpretation and commentary we have provided are for entertainment only.”  If you really want to see if your town or city has a law that might restrict your candy-collecting fun you should check out Municode.  A helpful tip: Start with the index if you can.  Happy Halloween! 

Swim With the Dolphins, But Leave the Manatees Be!

Manatees – or sea cows – have a rich history in mythology, often “tricking” sailors into confusing them with mermaids (Manatee 101 video). It’s only natural then, that people want to swim with the manatees, just as they do the dolphins. Alas, Florida law prohibits this – but not everyone is aware of that!

Consider this Please Do Not Ride the Manatees blog story (FYI: It includes some colorful language) from loweringthebar. It describes a woman in Florida who was swimming in the warm water with the manatees and now finds herself in hot water with the law!

Reliable blogs can be a good source for news stories, but they must be evaluated like any other secondary source. Some of the better news blogs will even provide specific citations to primary law or link out to primary sources on the open web. The loweringthebar blog does just that, linking out to the Florida Manatee Sanctuary Act on Online Sunshine.

What next though? What if you are interested in more information about manatee protection in Florida? Where should you look?

Well, armed with a statute citation, a great place to look is a set of Florida statutes with annotations.

We have two of those in the library – LexisNexis Florida Annotated Statutes and West’s Florida Statutes Annotated - located on the third floor in the Regional Collection. After the text of the statute itself, the annotations will provide you with references to cases related to that legislation, as well as cross references to other resources.

Now you are well on your way to understanding Manatee Law in Florida!

New Library Resources – Knowing is Half the Battle! – May 2012 Edition

Hello everyone, and welcome to another exciting edition of “New Library Resources” – it’s chock full of information you should know, because knowing is half the battle!

To view a table listing the new print resources that the library received in May 2012, click Continue reading below. Most of the items listed there can be found in the General Collection and checked out for up to three weeks by members of the Coastal Community.

Need to find some current information from the Congressional Record? Good news! HeinOnline will now be updating the Congressional Record Daily Edition every day to include the most current Congressional Record Daily Edition, just as it does with the Federal Register. Check out HeinOnline’s May Content Release and remember, you can access HeinOnline through the Library & Technology Center’s Subscription Databases page.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to stop by the Reference Desk on the third floor of the Library & Technology Center or contact the Reference Librarians via email, telephone (904.680.7612), or the Ask a Librarian form.

Check back here for monthly updates on what is being added to the Library & Technology Center collection. Updates will be published on the second Tuesday of every month.

If you think we should consider adding something to the collection, please feel free to recommend it here (Coastal ID login required).

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New Library Resources – What’s Happening – April 2012 Edition

Hello everyone, and welcome to another exciting edition of “New Library Resources” – because you need to know What’s Happening!

To view a table listing the new print resources that the library received in April 2012, click Continue reading below. Most of the items listed there can be found in the General Collection and checked out for up to three weeks by members of the Coastal Community.

We also now have access to HeinOnline’s new U.S. International Trade Library, which includes many useful legislative histories. You can see all the new additions to HeinOnline on its new content page (reproduced below under our new print resources) and you can access HeinOnline through the Library & Technology Center’s Subscription Databases page.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to stop by the Reference Desk on the third floor of the Library & Technology Center or contact the Reference Librarians via email, telephone (904.680.7612), or the Ask a Librarian form.

Check back here for monthly updates on what the Library & Technology Center is adding. Updates will be published on the second Tuesday of every month.

If you think we should consider adding something to the collection, please feel free to recommend it here (Coastal ID login required).

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New Library Resources – Acquiring Minds Want to Know – March 2012 Edition

Hello everyone, and welcome to another exciting edition of “New Library Resources” – because Acquiring Minds Want to Know!

To view a table listing the new print resources that the library received in March 2012, click Continue reading below. Most of the items listed there can be found in the General Collection and checked out for up to three weeks by members of the Coastal Community.

We also now have access to Covington & Burling’s prestigious collection of Congressional Hearings via HeinOnline’s U.S. Congressional Documents Collection. You can access HeinOnline through the Library & Technology Center’s Subscription Databases page.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to stop by the Reference Desk on the third floor of the Library & Technology Center or contact the Reference Librarians via email, telephone (904.680.7612), or the Ask a Librarian form.

Check back here for monthly updates on what the Library & Technology Center is adding. Updates will be published on the second Tuesday of every month.

If you think we should consider adding something to the collection, please feel free to recommend it here (Coastal ID login required).

Continue reading

Sometimes You Should Just Moonwalk… (from Lowering the Bar)

Though it can be difficult to believe at times, there is actually humor to be found in the law. And thanks to the internet and blogs, it is far easier to stay amused. One blog that does a particularly good job of combing laughter and law is Lowering the Bar.

Over the past seven years, since January 2005, blogger Kevin Underhill has offered legal humor based on things happening all around the world. A partner at Shook, Hardy & Bacon, L.L.P. in San Francisco, Underhill nevertheless finds time to post at least a few times a week.

While humor is always present, Underhill will often include some legal analysis as well (though he is careful to point out in his “Comical Yet Binding Disclaimer“ that the site provides no legal advice).

One recent post that combined humor and some legal references was Security Cam Records Burglar’s “Signature Dance Moves”.

You can also see the YouTube video after the cut.

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