Tag Archives: Low Cost Research

We’ve got new resources!

We’ve added new books! To view a table listing the new print resources that the library received since the start of October, 2013, click Continue reading below. Most of the items listed there can be found in the General Collection and checked out for up to three weeks by members of the Coastal Community.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to stop by the Reference Desk on the third floor of the Library & Technology Center or contact the Reference Librarians via email, telephone (904.680.7612), or the Ask a Librarian form.

If you think we should consider adding something to the collection, please feel free to recommend it here (Coastal ID login required).

Continue reading

Check out these new additions to the Coastal Library collection!

We’ve added new books! To view a table listing the new print resources that the library received since the start of September, 2013, click Continue reading below. Most of the items listed there can be found in the General Collection and checked out for up to three weeks by members of the Coastal Community.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to stop by the Reference Desk on the third floor of the Library & Technology Center or contact the Reference Librarians via email, telephone (904.680.7612), or the Ask a Librarian form.

If you think we should consider adding something to the collection, please feel free to recommend it here (Coastal ID login required).

Continue reading

Do you need to fill out your Florida Bar Character and Fitness Information?

Do you need to fill out your Florida Bar Character and Fitness Information? If you aren’t taking the Florida bar exam, maybe the character and fitness for another state? Maybe you are looking to get your Certified Legal Intern (CLI) clearance? If so, then do we have good news for you! The Library has put together a LibGuide full of resources to help you find the information required for the Character and Fitness portion of the Florida Bar and the CLI!

Take a look at this handy guide on the Library homepage under Resources and then LibGuides. Once in the Florida Coastal’s LibGuides site, look at the Florida Bar Character and Fitness Information LibGuide. It’s that easy!

 

Enjoy the summer, and do your research just to be safe!

With the summer season here, many people like to hit the beaches and have barbeques and other outdoor parties. Unfortunately though, with the summer fun, many police departments see an increase in crimes and complaints. Here are a couple websites that can help you be aware of dangerous areas and make sure you are not violating the law. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has a crime map that shows you where and what type of crimes have taken place anywhere in Duval County. Then check out Municode or the city’s website for the city you are in to make sure your barbeque or party is not violating local noise ordinances. These sites are very useful for practicing attorneys as well.   

How Do I Start My Research?

As summer jobs and internships start, one of the questions we get at the Library is “how do I start my research?”  The good news is, there are lots of resources on how to do that!

Some of the best resources are Libguides on legal research.  Libguides are created by librarians, and there are lots of law librarians helping you out!  Florida Coastal has a great one for low cost legal research

If you want more, run a search in Google for libguide starting legal research: .edu (that : .edu restricts the search to only school websites).  Or change up the language and run  starting legal research libguide: .edu (it will give you slightly different results).  Switch up the words for more results libguide beginning legal research: .edu for example.

Or, call a Librarian!  We are here all summer for you, whether it is for class, an externship or work!  You can call and leave a message, we will call you back – (904) 680-7612.  Or you can email us your question refdesk@fcsl.edu or use the Ask A Librarian page.

Climate Change Findings and Figures

No matter where you fall on the hot-button topic of climate change there is no denying it’s an important issue.  The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) released a summary of its most recent set of findings and figures in March.  The WMO is a specialized agency of the United Nations with a membership of 191 Member States and Territories (as of January 1, 2013). It originated from the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), which was founded in 1873. Established in 1950, WMO became the specialized agency of the United Nations in 1951 for meteorology (weather and climate), operational hydrology and related geophysical sciences.

As weather, climate and the water cycles know no national boundaries, international cooperation at a global scale is essential for the development of meteorology and operational hydrology as well as to reap the benefits from their application. WMO provides the framework for such international cooperation.

This summary and website can lead you to a ton of other international sources on climate and environmental law.  Use the list of topics at the top of WMO’s home page or the facets on the left to find relevant information that may be more difficult to get to simply by using the web site search box.  Evaluating and making use of all access points (also known as finding aids) are important research processes.

In the Library this Week (March 25th – 31st):

- Low Cost Legal Research Workshops;
- Make-up (Statutes, Shepards, Cases & Secondary Sources) Workshops;
- Navigating Lexis & Secondary Sources Training;
- Cases & Statutes in Lexis Training;
- Navigating Westlaw & Secondary Sources Training;
- Cases & Statutes in Westlaw Training;
- Hot Dog Wednesday hosted by the Library & IT;
- Pick up your new Coastal ID in the Atrium on Monday & Tuesday from 10am-2pm;
- Possible noise from the Atrium on Tuesday & Thursday at noon.

Are YOU Ready to Celebrate Sunshine Week?

If your response is, “What is sunshine week?” you are probably not alone.  Sunshine Week is a national initiative to promote a dialogue about the importance of open government and freedom of information. Participants include news media, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and others interested in the public’s right to know.  This is an important topic because access to the law is really important to lawyers, law students, and law librarians.  Check out all the great FREE legal information available on FDSys.  The Library of Congress makes finding legislative and congressional information a breeze with ThomasHere is an example of how an open government can force a public figure to answer for their use of public funds.  The list of reasons supporting open government and freedom of information is huge.  What reasons can you think of?

The oldest law library in the United States is a great resource for small firms and solo-practitioners!

The Jenkins Law Library located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is over 200 years old, but don’t let its age cause you to think that it is just a relic of the past. The Jenkins Law Library is still going strong and makes available a wealth of legal research tools and resources. Students, solo-practitioners, and law firms can become members of the law library and take advantage of the many databases and resources available. Even if you are not a member of the Jenkins Law Library, the law library offers services that may be useful to attorneys, such as legal research, copying, Shepardizing or Keyciting cases, and document delivery. The Jenkins Law Library is a great low cost alternative to other well-known legal information providers.

The CRAP test.

I like to follow blogs about libraries and research. One of my favorites is Lisa Gold: Research Maven. Lisa is a professional researcher, who explains research concepts well. Check out her colorful post, “The CRAP test for evaluating sources,” for a good explanation of how to decide if a source you have found can be relied upon. If you click the “Highlights” link at the top of her page, you can see a list of her most notable posts. My favorites are, “Spell-check is evil, but funny: The Cupertino Effect,” “Let’s talk about search,” and “In praise of browsing.”