Tag Archives: Research

Other law libraries

We at the Florida Coastal Library really, really like you all.  We are here to help and answer your questions.  But you may not be close by, you may need a print resource.  If you can’t come to us, then definitely go to another library!  They are (almost) as nice and helpful as we are.

Where can you go?  Well, that depends.  Most states have some kind of public law library system – you can look at some lists of those libraries, both national and regional.  You can also do a search in Google (or your favorite search engine) for something like county law library list (if you have an area, like Florida or California or Duval County, to add to the search that’s even better!).

You can also use public law school libraries for free in most cases.  And even private law schools will often let you in (sometimes for a small fee, but often at least a couple times for free).  There are also some lists of the law school libraries (this one goes directly to their catalogs, but you can then find the name of the law school near you).  Or you can look at the law schools and find their library page.

Once you find a library – do not be shy to talk to the librarians, they want to help you (just be sure to use your best library voice…).

How Do I Start My Research?

As summer jobs and internships start, one of the questions we get at the Library is “how do I start my research?”  The good news is, there are lots of resources on how to do that!

Some of the best resources are Libguides on legal research.  Libguides are created by librarians, and there are lots of law librarians helping you out!  Florida Coastal has a great one for low cost legal research

If you want more, run a search in Google for libguide starting legal research: .edu (that : .edu restricts the search to only school websites).  Or change up the language and run  starting legal research libguide: .edu (it will give you slightly different results).  Switch up the words for more results libguide beginning legal research: .edu for example.

Or, call a Librarian!  We are here all summer for you, whether it is for class, an externship or work!  You can call and leave a message, we will call you back – (904) 680-7612.  Or you can email us your question refdesk@fcsl.edu or use the Ask A Librarian page.

Climate Change Findings and Figures

No matter where you fall on the hot-button topic of climate change there is no denying it’s an important issue.  The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) released a summary of its most recent set of findings and figures in March.  The WMO is a specialized agency of the United Nations with a membership of 191 Member States and Territories (as of January 1, 2013). It originated from the International Meteorological Organization (IMO), which was founded in 1873. Established in 1950, WMO became the specialized agency of the United Nations in 1951 for meteorology (weather and climate), operational hydrology and related geophysical sciences.

As weather, climate and the water cycles know no national boundaries, international cooperation at a global scale is essential for the development of meteorology and operational hydrology as well as to reap the benefits from their application. WMO provides the framework for such international cooperation.

This summary and website can lead you to a ton of other international sources on climate and environmental law.  Use the list of topics at the top of WMO’s home page or the facets on the left to find relevant information that may be more difficult to get to simply by using the web site search box.  Evaluating and making use of all access points (also known as finding aids) are important research processes.

Finals Season is Approaching

Finals are coming faster than you know it.  Check out the newest additions to the library’s collection and see if there is anything that might help you study for exams or finish up that ALWR. 

TITLE CALL # LOCATION
Civil procedure in a nutshell / by Mary Kay Kane. KF8841 .K36 2013 fca,fcb
Climate change and Indigenous peoples : the search for legal remedies / edited by Randall S. Abate, Elizabeth Ann Kronk. K3247 .C55 2013 fcg  
Evidence / Christopher B. Mueller, Laird C. Kirkpatrick. KF8935 .M836 2012 fcg  
Fighting for their lives : inside the experience of capital defense attorneys / Susannah Sheffer. KF9227.C2 S54 2013 fcg  
Global environmental governance : law and regulation for the 21st century / Louis J. Kotzé. K3585 .K68 2012 fcg  
Injustice on appeal : the United States Courts of Appeals in crisis / William M. Richman, William L. Reynolds. KF8750 .R53 2013 fcg  
Inside civil procedure : what matters and why / Howard M. Erichson. KF8841 .E75 2012 fca,fcb
International logistics : the management of international trade operations / Pierre A. David, Richard D. Stewart. HF5415.7 .D38 2010 fcg  
The lawyer bubble : a profession in crisis / Steven J. Harper. KF300 .H3687 2013 fcg  
Logistics and supply chain management : creating value-added networks / Martin Christopher. HD38.5 .C46 2005 fcg  
A manual of style for contract drafting / Kenneth A. Adams. KF807 .A33 2013 fcg  
Multistate bar exam (MBE) review. KF303 .M847 2010 fcb  
Multistate performance test (MPT) review. KF303 .M855 fcb  
A practical guide to software licensing for licensees and licensors / H. Ward Classen. KF3024.C6 C56 2013 fcg  
Principles of international environmental law / Philippe Sands, Jacqueline Peel with Adriana Fabra, Ruth MacKenzie. K3585 .S265 2012 fcg  
Property / Steven L. Emanuel. KF570.Z9 E43 2012 fca,fcb
Settlement negotiation techniques in family law : a guide to improved tactics and resolution / Gregg Herman. KF535 .H47 2013 fcg  
Siegel’s criminal procedure : essay and multiple-choice questions and answers / Brian N. Siegel, Lazar Emanuel   revised by Christian M. Halliburton. KF9619.5 .S543 2012 fca,fcb
Supply chain management : a logistics perspective / John J. Coyle … [et al.]. HD38.5 .C69 2009 fcg  
The terror courts : rough justice at Guantanamo Bay / Jess Bravin. KF7661 .B73 2013 fcg  
Transportation : a supply chain perspective / John J. Coyle … [et al.]. HE151 .C88 2011 fcg  
Understanding student rights in schools : speech, religion, and privacy in educational settings / Bryan R. Warnick. KF4150 .W37 2013 fcg  
Wills, trusts, and estates : examples and explanations / Gerry W. Beyer. KF755.Z9 B49 2012 fcb  

Google Search by Image

(No, I am not talking about Google Image Search, although I like that feature. Google Image Search will respond to your Google search with images from the web. I used it to find this great blog that compiles cartoons about libraries and librarians: http://librarycartoons.wordpress.com/.)

Google Search by Image is a new feature that allows you to use an image as your search. You can drag and drop your image if it is online, or type in its URL. If the image is not online, you will need to save the image to your hard drive, and then upload it. Firefox and Chrome add-ons are available to make the process easier. They have a video on how it works here:  http://www.google.com/insidesearch/features/images/searchbyimage.html.

Do you have a picture of a building, and need to know what it is? Have a picture of a vehicle, and need its make and model? Give Google search by image a try.

What do you like about Lexis Advance?

As a Librarian, I try to keep up with new research tools.  It has been hard before to see how cases are treated across jurisdictions, which can often be very helpful if arguing for a change in law.  But not anymore! Lexis Advance has a great feature that lets you see how cases have been treated by other courts across jurisdictions and across years.  Once you log into Lexis Advance (if you are having trouble with that, please contact any of the Librarians) just Shepardize a case.  Go to Citing Decisions and choose Grid.  Especially if you like to visualize what has happened to a case, this is a perfect resource.

Lexis has a great explanation of this feature, and other features of their Shepard’s service, in their information.

Are YOU Ready to Celebrate Sunshine Week?

If your response is, “What is sunshine week?” you are probably not alone.  Sunshine Week is a national initiative to promote a dialogue about the importance of open government and freedom of information. Participants include news media, civic groups, libraries, nonprofits, schools and others interested in the public’s right to know.  This is an important topic because access to the law is really important to lawyers, law students, and law librarians.  Check out all the great FREE legal information available on FDSys.  The Library of Congress makes finding legislative and congressional information a breeze with ThomasHere is an example of how an open government can force a public figure to answer for their use of public funds.  The list of reasons supporting open government and freedom of information is huge.  What reasons can you think of?

In the Library this Week (March 4th – 10th)

- ALWR Research Workshops;
- Researching Statutes Workshops;
- Advanced Bluebooking for Memos Workshops;
- Earplugs by request during midterms, ask at the Circulation Desk.

Library Spring Break Hours (March 8th -17th)
Friday (8th)               7:30am – 6:00pm
Saturday (9th)         10:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday (10th)         10:00am – 6:00pm
Monday (11th)        10:00am – 6:00pm
Tuesday (12th)       10:00am – 6:00pm
Wednesday (13th)  10:00am – 6:00pm
Thursday (14th)      10:00am – 6:00pm
Friday (15th)           10:00am – 6:00pm
Saturday (16th)       10:00am – 6:00pm
Sunday (17th)          Regular Hours

The CRAP test.

I like to follow blogs about libraries and research. One of my favorites is Lisa Gold: Research Maven. Lisa is a professional researcher, who explains research concepts well. Check out her colorful post, “The CRAP test for evaluating sources,” for a good explanation of how to decide if a source you have found can be relied upon. If you click the “Highlights” link at the top of her page, you can see a list of her most notable posts. My favorites are, “Spell-check is evil, but funny: The Cupertino Effect,” “Let’s talk about search,” and “In praise of browsing.”

Don’t Make the Judge Angry!

Have you seen the recent article about a Miami area drug possession bond hearing? The video clip and article can be found here. We can all agree that it is not a good idea to disrespect a judge. And of course, every lawyer and law student knows to show respect to a judge in her own courtroom. We may have to rethink this assumption after watching this clip from the People’s Court with a University of Miami law student. Wow!

Ethical opinions are often not easily found in the typical law student’s first choice for legal research (i.e. Westlaw or Lexis). However, most ethical opinions can be found on the open Internet. The recent ABA ethical opinions are on the ABA website. The archive of older ethical opinions is available for ABA members. (Law student dues are only $25 or three years for $60).

State ethical opinions are often available from the state bar website or the state supreme court website. Often an Internet search of the state name and “ethical opinions” will quickly find ethical opinions. Once located the search function within the websites vary. In Florida, ethical opinions are available on the Florida Bar website which is searchable by opinion number or keyword. The results produced from the search include a brief summary of the subject matter. In California, the ethical opinions can only be searched along with the rest of the Bar website. In Illinois the voluntary bar association has advisory opinions that can be browsed and searched by subject or full-text, while the Illinois Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission provide both basic and advanced search functions of the official ethical rules and opinions.

So know your duties and obligations as a lawyer – and don’t make the judge angry!