Author Archives: Florida Coastal School of Law

Post Mortem NFL Draft — Bad Teams Pick Bad Players

Now that the 2013 NFL draft is over, and all the anticipation and emotionalism has subsided, we can get back to reality. And for this draft, like others, I can say the same thing I used to like to say in court when a witness let his education get in the way of his intelligence, “Your honor, the truth is not that complicated.”  The reality is that perennially good teams are good because they pick good people for the particular job. Bad teams are bad because despite being good people, they pick bad people for that job and add bad luck as a companion.  Another axiom fits: “Success and failure starts at the top.”

… Roger Groves dissects the more recent drafts of the Jacksonville Jaguars at SportsMoney.

Issue of boys playing on girls sports teams to be debated in Pa.

Nancy Hogshead-Makar, who won three gold medals in swimming at the 1984 Olympics, is now the senior director of advocacy for the Women’s Sports Foundation and a sports law professor at Florida Coastal School of Law. She’s considered an expert on Title IX. When contacted Thursday by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, she said she understood the complexity of the issue in Pennsylvania.

“Sports are unique,” Hogshead-Makar said. “Other than bathrooms, they are the only sex-segregated area because of the physical differences between boys and girls.”

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/sports/high-school-other/boys-and-girls-sports-to-come-under-debate-686079/#ixzz2SEfZhYr0

ESPN and the SEC Make a Deal. So Who Needs the NCAA?

“We already know the tail wags the college football dog.  Television rights are the plasma of profitability for big time college football programs.  The TV rights equation is really played out in one of three scenarios: (1) TV and a school, (2) TV and a conference and/or (3) TV and the NCAA.  There was a time in the 1940’s when a few prominent schools established their own relationships with a major TV network. The NCAA sued, and the schools blinked.”

… read on for the entire piece by Roger Groves.

Towson University baseball bailout assailed

While Title IX may have come into play in Loeschke’s decision at Towson, the situation at this university mirrors that of many schools that decide to cut sports programs. It almost always comes down to a lack of financial resources, not an issue of federal compliance that spells doom for men’s sports programs, said Nancy Hogshead-Makar, a former Olympic swimmer and senior director of advocacy for The Women’s Sports Foundation.

“When schools do have to cut a men’s program, it is inevitably — and both Maryland and Towson are prime examples of this — because of budgets, because they can not support the size of the athletic program that they would like to,” said Hogshead-Makar, who is also a law professor at Florida Coastal School of Law.

… read the entire story at Diamondback Online.

Cinderella Cannot Afford to Pay for National Championships in College Basketball. Michigan and Louisville Can.

“Every season purist lovers of college basketball hope to find a Florida Golf Coast with no money beating a financially-endowed tall cotton program. Eventually, right about final four or no later than the national championship game, reality sets in. The equation we don’t want to admit hits us in the face anew: Big money = Big Program= Final Four= National Champion.”

… read the entire piece at SportsMoney.

Firing Rutgers Coach is not the Solution — Knowing How to Hire Is

“Rutgers men’s basketball coach Mike Rice was fired once his practice videos went public. It showed him playing dodge ball with him distributing all the kill shots, and abusive homophobic anti-gay shots, and pushing and hitting with more adolescent tantrums than the adolescents. And oh by the way, he lost more games than he won this year.

All the discussion has been about four items:”

follow on for the four items and Roger’s take on the situation.

Let’s See How Much Louisville and the NCAA Cares About Kevin Ware

“Louisville coach Rick Pitino said the bone was punched six inches beyond the skin. The reference was to Kevin Ware. The game was not football as you might expect, but basketball in the first half of Louisville’s game against Duke in their battle to go to the Final Four.  His leg is reportedly broken in two places. Pitino shed tears. His teammates on the floor were crying. Yet Ware said “win the game”.   They did.”

… read the entire piece at SportsMoney.